Monday, September 9, 2013

Fallen leaves



Sunday was my turn to bring cookies to coffee hour. After perusing my supplies, I realized that I needed a cookie recipe that didn't call for eggs, baking powder or very much butter. If you bake, then you know that reduces my selection of recipes to a minimum.

Then I remembered gingerbread cookies. They use about half the butter of most recipes, no baking powder (only baking soda), and no eggs whatsoever. They get their leaven from a combination of the acidic molasses and the baking soda. Bingo! I found my cookie! A frugal cookie choice when I'm low on eggs, butter and baking powder. (You can find my recipe for gingerbread cut-out cookies in this link.)


I had actually wanted to make these for a couple of years. I have these autumn leaf cutters, you see, and I just thought they'd look appropriate done in a gingerbread, like a fallen leaf.



After baking, I drizzled with a maple icing. They were delicious, and I thought very beautiful, too. Just my kind of cookie. . . fallen leaves.

What's your favorite go-to frugal cookie?

16 comments:

  1. Yum, now I know what I will be making with the molasses I have in the pantry (which I currently only use to make ketchup).

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    1. Hi Economies,
      Molasses in ketchup -- now that would add an interesting dimension to the flavor. I'll try that with my next batch!

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  2. It's hard to go wrong with any kind of gingerbread/cookie. They look delicious.

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    1. Hi live and learn,
      I love the flavor of gingerbread, this time of year, even more so than in winter. All the spices are so warming!

      Delete
  3. hi lili
    yum!!!! they look delicious!!!
    i have autumn leaf cutters too.
    wishing you a nice day,
    regina

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    1. Hi Regina,
      Do you have a favorite type of cookie dough that you like to use your leaf cutters on?
      You're so sweet -- I wish you a lovely day, as well!!

      Delete
  4. That is a great idea! I love that you cut them as leaves!

    I'm down to my last jar of molasses, unfortunately, and there is just a tiny bit left. I need to find a new source for it in a bigger container.

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    1. Hi Brandy,
      Thank you!

      I buy molasses in 1-gallon jugs, at our cash and carry restaurant supply. I use molasses to make brown sugar substitute in baking, as well as in particular recipes calling for molasses. So, for that amount of use, 1 gallon will last our family about 1 year to 1 & 1/4 years. I think I paid between $12-13 last year on a gallon. A nearby Sam's or Smart and Final might also carry it in large sizes at a favorable price, for you.

      Delete
  5. I love molasses! You made a good choice. I love using molasses instead of brown sugar as my sweetener in oatmeal bread--I think it gives the flavor more depth and makes the bread more moist.

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    1. Kris, your oatmeal bread sounds delicious. I'll have to try something like that with molasses!

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  6. These are so impressive! I make gingerbread cookies about once a year but it never occurred to me to dress them up with a drizzle like that!

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    1. The drizzle of maple glaze was my artistic daughter's idea! I have to give credit where credit is due!

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  7. What do you do when waffle recipe uses baking soda too?

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    1. Hi Americana Lady,
      I'm not sure what you are asking. Are you asking if there's a substitute for baking soda? Or are you asking if when substituting baking soda plus an acid (vinegar/molasses) for baking powder, *and* the recipe calls for baking soda, does one add the amount of baking soda in addition to the b.soda/vinegar? If you are asking the former, I don't know of any substitute for baking soda. But if you are asking the latter -- if you have a recipe that calls for both baking soda and baking powder, and you want to use the substitute for the baking powder, *then* you measure the called-for baking soda, plus the substituted b.soda/vinegar (in place of b.powder).

      If I didn't answer your question clearly enough, maybe you can be more specific with your recipe's ingredients, and I can try answering again.

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I'm so glad that you stopped by today. Please comment, and let me know what you're thinking.