Monday, May 29, 2017

Using Bottled Lemon Juice That Has Gone Off

I had this jug of lemon juice in the pantry from a purchase I made a little over a year ago. I think that I had calculated that we would need more lemon juice soon, when I found it on sale at Cash & Carry. And then an odd thing happened and no one was drinking homemade lemonade any more in our house. Years of everyone drinking the homemade lemonade, then suddenly no one wanted any. As a result, I didn't go through the bottle in the fridge as quickly.

The other day I did finish off that original bottle, and went to open the one from the pantry. Inside the jug it looked dark. I poured a little bit into a glass container, and it was definitely darker than normal. It smelled not quite as lemony, and maybe a little off. But, of course, I'm not sure. I'm not about to drink it; however, I didn't want to pour it out.

So . . .

Lemon juice is an acid and a good degreaser. I can attest that along with a little scrubbing, it makes a decent bathtub and sink cleaner. I also added a little to my (el cheapo) hand dishwashing liquid, to boost the degreasing ability. I'll be trying it in several cleaning applications.

Just couldn't allow myself to toss it out. If I can use this lemon juice where I would normally use vinegar, this will extend my current supply of vinegar substantially. Waste not, want not.

8 comments:

  1. It's also good to clean your garbage disposal. That's how I usually use any "discarded" lemon products.

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    1. Hi live and learn,
      I use lemon rind for this, and I agree that they clean the disposal super well. I bet that I could freeze the lemon juice in a small ice cube tray and use to clean the disposal, too. Thanks for the input!

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  2. Brilliant blog again Lili. What a fantastic way to use up something that had "turned". Sadly, I didn't think of that a couple of months ago when I discovered a similar bottle at the back of the pantry. But, hopefully, I will remind this advice if I encounter that issue again. Thank you!

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    1. Hi Jayne,
      I super glad that I discovered this works so well on the bathtub; that is one item that I really don't like cleaning chemical residue, since I would be soaking in it later. I'm sorry you had a bottle of lemon juice go off, too. I know how disappointed I was, and felt like I had wasted money.
      Have a great day, Jayne!

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  3. What a great idea Lili! Have a great Memorial day!

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    1. Hi Ruthie,
      It's great not to waste something. I hope your Memorial Day was lovely, too!

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  4. I am still searching for a practical use for past dated baking powder and psyllium. I may resort to using it somehow somewhere in crafting. Everything including the kitchen sink ends there lol I tried cleaning with the baking powder, it did a far poorer job than fresh baking soda.

    YHF

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    Replies
    1. Hi YHF,
      you might be able to sort of salvage the baking powder, by boosting it's efficacy. It might not be totally flat. You can test an acid "fix" for it, as it may be the acid that is no longer reactive. Put a teaspoon of baking powder into a cup, and pour 1/4 cup of hot water over it, along with 1 teaspoon of vinegar. If you get bubbles, then you could try using the baking powder in some thing like pancakes, adding 1 teaspoon of vinegar for every teaspoon of baking powder n the recipe. It might be worth checking if the vinegar addition helps, as all you would be out, would be 1 teaspoon of vinegar. The psyllium might be a good addition to soil in pots outside, to help hold in moisture between waterings, but I don't know for sure. Good luck!

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