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Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Cheap and Cheerful Supper or Brunch: Waffle Omelets


One of the challenges to scratch home-cooked meals is adding some excitement to the family dining experience without a lot of extra work or expense. This past week, these waffle omelets met that need for both me and my family. 

I already had the waffle iron and all of the ingredients, so there was no extra expense. With regards to the work, waffle omelets were actually easier to make than traditional skillet omelets because I didn't need to add the filling during cooking or fold the omelet over. And, I was able to allow the omelet to cook while I tended to other meal prep tasks for dinner. My family was in agreement-- these were very good. 



Here's how to make waffle omelets in your home.

What you'll need:

a waffle iron
non-stick cooking spray or oil and a pastry brush

eggs
omelet fillings, such as ham, cooked bacon, cooked sausage, cooked chicken/turkey, cheese, and diced or shredded vegetables -- per each egg, use about 1/4 cup of shredded cheese, 1/4 cup of cooked meat, and 1/3 cup of prepared vegetables (it's important that any meat is cooked before adding to the waffle iron, but veggies can be raw)
salt, pepper, herbs
"wet" topping, such as salsa, cream soup/sauce, or leftover gravy






  • Preheat your waffle iron.
  • Meanwhile, prepare your filling ingredients. Beat your eggs in a medium-size bowl, then dump your filling and seasoning ingredients into the eggs.



  • Prepare your waffle grids, both top and bottom, by spraying very well with non-stick cooking spray or by brushing very well with oil, using a pastry brush. With eggs, it's very important that the grids are well greased.



  • When the waffle iron is heated, scoop the eggs and fillings onto the bottom grid, using about 1 egg and about 3/4 cup of filling (just eyeball this) per waffle, then close the waffler. The eggs will expand substantially during cooking. So, when you see the egg and filling on the grids when first added, it may not look adequate. Trust me, it will be once the omelet is cooked.
  • (My waffle iron is a Belgian waffler with deep pockets and square waffles. Each square used 1 egg and 3/4 cup of filling ingredients. A shallow waffler or one that makes smaller waffles (the waffler that makes 1 large round waffle that breaks into 4 sections may fit this description) might take a reduced amount of egg and filling ingredients.)



  • Cook the omelet until the steam has ended and/or the light goes off. Carefully open the iron and pry the waffle off with a fork. The color should be golden brown. If the omelet is sticking badly, you may have not greased the iron adequately for this preparation or the waffle may not be completely done. 
  • Waffle omelets are delicious topped with salsa, a cream sauce/cream soup, or gravy.


Like all omelets, this idea is versatile with regards to ingredients. Here are a couple of possibilities:


  • post-Thanksgiving -- leftover turkey (chopped well), cheese, leftover veggies plus onions, and seasonings mixed with beaten eggs and cooked in the waffle iron. Once cooked, topped with leftover gravy and a dollop of cranberry sauce on the side.  
  • New Year's Day -- a filling of chopped leftover ham, cheese, veggies (finely chopped broccoli would be good) and onions. Once cooked, topped with some diluted cream soup or salsa.

Enjoy!

Have you made waffle omelets before? What other uses have you found for your waffle maker?

10 comments:

Kris said...

This sounds so good! I really like your Thanksgiving recipe idea. Around my house, the grill and the waffle iron are my husband's area of expertise. Waffles are such a flexible food!

I tried this recipe tonight for dessert--mine didn't turn out quite so pretty, but it was tasty and fun (and frugal!). I used diced apples with spices and sugar instead of apple pie filling. https://www.craftsalamode.com/2015/11/cutest-apple-pie-baked-in-apple.html

Anonymous said...

Oh my goodness, these look so delicious! Can't wait to try out the recipe.

- Tina

Alice said...

Lili,

So glad you posted this recipe. I had never heard of this before but analyzing the ingredients it is absolutely something I can have as it looks low carb to me! Will probably try it this weekend.

Alice

Anonymous said...

Lili,

That is so clever, I never would have thought to use my waffle maker for anything other than making waffles! I think I need to start thinking "outside the box".

Thanks,
Shelby

Live and Learn said...

These look fun and great. It's interesting how the same foods presented a different way can taste "different". We don't have a waffle maker, but you can guess that long ago I gave up making omelets for scrambled eggs. We often add extra ingredients like you do and while the eggs require a little attention in the skillet, it's not much.

Lili said...

Kris said...
This sounds so good! I really like your Thanksgiving recipe idea. Around my house, the grill and the waffle iron are my husband's area of expertise. Waffles are such a flexible food!

I tried this recipe tonight for dessert--mine didn't turn out quite so pretty, but it was tasty and fun (and frugal!). I used diced apples with spices and sugar instead of apple pie filling. https://www.craftsalamode.com/2015/11/cutest-apple-pie-baked-in-apple.html


Apple Pie Baked in an Apple
Hi Kris,
that's just the cutest thing. Thanks for sharing that link. These would make beautiful alternatives to pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving dinner.
I agree -- waffles are very versatile. My mother would sometimes top unsweetened waffles with creamed chicken and peas. Putting the meat and vegetables on top of a waffle was one way to get me to eat dinner. now that I think about it, I may have to add that to our round-up very soon.
Thanks for the link, Kris!

Lili said...

Thank you, Tina! Enjoy!

Lili said...

Alice said...
Lili,

So glad you posted this recipe. I had never heard of this before but analyzing the ingredients it is absolutely something I can have as it looks low carb to me! Will probably try it this weekend.


Hi Alice,
yes, these are definitely low-carb waffles, no different from having an omelet. Enjoy!

Lili said...

Shelby said...
Lili,

That is so clever, I never would have thought to use my waffle maker for anything other than making waffles! I think I need to start thinking "outside the box"


Hi Shelby,
I'm glad that you like this. I can't take credit for thinking of it, though. One of my cousins made these last year and shared on facebook. I just added my own twist to them by topping with gravy and salsa (different times, not together).
Have a great day, Shelby!

Lili said...

Live and Learn said...
These look fun and great. It's interesting how the same foods presented a different way can taste "different". We don't have a waffle maker, but you can guess that long ago I gave up making omelets for scrambled eggs. We often add extra ingredients like you do and while the eggs require a little attention in the skillet, it's not much.


Hi Live and Learn,
You've described it exactly -- find a way to prepare the same foods differently and they suddenly have new interest. At least it has worked that way in my family all of these years. But then, I always say that we're an easy to please bunch.
I still make omelets from time to time. I have very fond memories of my first year away from home in college, Sunday evenings, no meal service in the cafeteria that night, so a group of us would go to this smoke-filled diner in town and get omelets. The smoke was annoying but the food was cheap and good -- perfect for a college student. So sometimes, I reminisce about those cheese and mushroom omelets and make one for myself. Thanks for letting me go down memory lane right now!

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